Procedure

Dislocated Hip Treatment- Orthopedics

Disclaimer: Please note that Mya Care does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The information provided is not intended to replace the care or advice of a qualified health care professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

A Hip Dislocation a disruption of the joint between the femur and pelvis. Specifically it is when the ball–shaped head of the femur comes out of the cup–shaped acetabulum of the pelvis. Symptoms typically include pain and an inability move the hip.

Hip dislocation rehabilitation can take anywhere from two to three months, depending on the patient. Complications to nearby nerves and blood vessels can sometimes cause loss of blood supply to the bone, also known as osteonecrosis. The protective cartilage on the bone can also be disturbed from this type of injury. For this reason, it is important for patients to contact a physician and get treatment immediately following injury.

  • The first step to recovering from a hip dislocation is reduction. This refers to putting the bones back into their intended positions. Normally, this is done by a physician while the patient is under a sedative. Other times, a surgical procedure is required to reduce the hip bones back into their natural state.
  • Next, rest, ice, and take anti-inflammatory medication to reduce swelling at the hip.
  • Weight bearing is allowed for the type one posterior dislocation, but should only be done as pain allows and patient is comfortable.
  • Within 5–7 days of the injury occurrence, patients may perform passive range of motion exercises to increase flexibility.
  • A walking aid should be used until the patient is comfortable with both weight bearing and range of motion.
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